Big and Small

Welcome../../../../Welcome.html../../../../Welcome.htmlshapeimage_1_link_0
Books../../../../My_Books.html../../../../My_Books.htmlshapeimage_2_link_0
Professional Development../../../../My_Work.html../../../../My_Work.htmlshapeimage_3_link_0
Thoughts../../../Thoughts.html../../../Thoughts.htmlshapeimage_4_link_0
 
 

Most of us think of charts as a way to record ideas that have come up in class conversation, lesson topics that have been taught, or examples of how to use a strategy. Of course these charts are helpful, especially when we teach children how to use them. Recently, though, I’ve been seeing teachers use charts in some interesting new ways.

A little credit and thanks here to Cory Gillette for the term thinking template, to distinguish this type of cloze from traditional cloze.